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It all started with some leftover whipped cream.

Leftover whipped cream is a sad sight. Before long, it turns into a floating island of whipped cream on top of a milky puddle. Mmmm.

But if you’re careful, and you act quickly (say, by the next day) you can save the part on top from being completely lost.  In fact, I once learned that whipped cream is best stored in a sieve propped over a bowl.  I had not done this in my sleepy haze the night before, so I had no time to waste.

Rewind to Sunday, grocery store day. Beautiful rhubarb in the produce section and a recipe from Gourmet Live just waiting to be tested.

That’s when this happened:

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The recipe isn’t too fancy. Chop some rhubarb and toss it in a pan with just enough sugar to keep it tart. Simmer until it turns jammy. Cool.

Whip some cream, add some sour cream and powdered sugar, whip some more, then add a splash of sherry.

Layer them together in a pretty cup and crumble some ginger snaps on top. I used the ginger snap recipe from my dear old copy of Joy of Cooking, subbing about 1/3 of the flour with whole wheat flour…combined with dairy and fruit, this might even pass as breakfast!

What’s the problem with this recipe?  Too much whipped cream. Fast forward to Wednesday.

I was going to make a quiche, so first I made some pastry dough. I like to use Julia Child’s recipe from Julia and Jacques Cooking at Home (signed by Jacques no less — thanks Rob!). It’s classic and easy and I realized that my past failings with pastry dough came largely from lack of confidence. Using the same recipe over and over has helped me overcome.

Letting the dough rest in the fridge gave my taste buds just enough time to start thinking about the whipped cream…and the leftover rhubarb jam…and the apples on the kitchen table…and then the quiche became a frittata with a lovely fruit pie for dessert. Perfect!

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So I discovered another blog that I love (what happened to using my cookbooks for a while?).  The Transplanted Baker is a treasure trove of Scandinavian delights.  The best part is, it’s written in English!

Of course, I started with a cookie recipe (though I have to admit, I am drawn to the Geitost Bling after trying this brown Norwegian cheese for the first time a few years ago).  This Maple-Pecan Shortbread gave me the perfect reason to pull out the miniature cookie cutters that Rob brought home from a recent tag sale excursion.  After further reading, I discovered that these are not actually Norwegian, but they certainly were delicious!

According to the Spar website (read with the assistance of Microsoft Translator), the seven traditional cookies of Christmas in Norway are smultringer, sandkaker, sirupssnipper, berlinerkranser, goro, krumkaker and fattigmann.  Now I know which recipes to look for next year!